January
17
2012

Bird Collision with Wind Turbine

Here is an real video of a bird collision with a wind turbine.  The video is not edited and is graphic, so please be advised.

 

 

November
3
2014

Who Gives a Hoot About Turbines?

The barn owl has done what no anti-wind turbine protester in Port Ryerse has been able to do to date: halt construction of a green energy project in their village.

A woman walking her dog this summer spotted one of the birds — they are on the endangered species list in Ontario — flying into a barn.

An investigation ensued, photographs of the owl perched on a woodpile were taken, and the sighting was confirmed. The evidence was then presented to an environmental review tribunal hearing, which last week slapped a five-month moratorium on the project.

Boralex, the company that wants to construct a four-turbine 10-megawatt wind farm next to Lake Erie, must now apply to the Ontario government for what’s known as an “overall benefit permit” if it wants to continue with the project.

It must submit an amended plan showing how the wind farm will avoid having a negative impact on the owls and that it has explored alternative sites. It must also show it will do something to help the birds, such as creating new habitat.

The tribunal hearing has been adjourned until March 31.

The Port Ryerse case is the first time a project in Ontario has been ordered back to the drawing board due to the presence of barn owls.

As a result, “there are a number of unknowns right now that will take some work and some time to bring to a conclusion,” Sylvia Davis, legal counsel for the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, wrote in an email to the parties to the hearing.

Read more…

October
31
2014

Double, Double, Bats in Trouble: Local Efforts to Save Bats

Bats are in double trouble: Bat species that migrate long distances are being killed in wind turbines, while White-nose syndrome is devastating bat species that migrate shorter distances. Meanwhile, homeowners routinely kill bats when they find them in their houses. But we need bats (just not in our attics!), so safe and humane removal can be done via a “bat exclusion.” That’s the focus of the Halloween installment of WEMU’s “The Green Room”.

Barbara Lucas: I’m at the 13th Annual Great Lakes Bat Festival at Washtenaw Community College. Attending is the Kimball family of Chelsea. They recently moved into an old farmhouse which they share with a small colony of Big Brown bats. Here’s Gabe Kimball, on why he likes them:

Gabe: For one, they are so cool to look at! Also we have a lot a lot less mosquitoes than in the city even. We call it farm TV when we watch the bats leave.

Lucas: Also at the festival is Rob Mies, Executive Director of the Organization for Bat Conservation. He offers to teach the Kimballs the key steps to a bat exclusion, evicting bats without killing them. On the way to the Kimball farmhouse, he tells me why we should fear a world without bats.

Read more…

October
30
2014

Turbines Kill More Birds of Prey than Shooting or Poisoning

Wind turbines have killed more birds of prey in Scotland so far this year than deliberate poisoning or shooting, a government report has revealed.

Four raptors were confirmed killed by the devices between January and June this year and a fifth bird – a golden eagle – was electrocuted by a power line.

Just two birds were confirmed to have been poisoned or shot over the same period.

The figures were revealed by in an interim report published by the Scottish Government-funded Wildlife Incident Investigation Scheme.

Read more…

October
30
2014

Resistance to Bird-Killing Turbines Grows

The natives are restless, and their ire is directed against an intruder armed with taxpayer subsidies and intent on destroying as much scenic beauty and wildlife as it can get away with.

Across the country, giant wind farms, among the ghastliest monstrosities ever devised by man, are scarring the countryside in the name of providing renewable energy. But as the toll of slaughtered birds and bats mounts, people are fighting back. Here’s an update:

Minnesota: Not even the heft of Texas billionaire T. Boone Pickens could overcome the resistance of conservationists and ordinary citizens to the construction of a 48-turbine wind farm near Red Wing, 25 miles southeast of Minneapolis/St. Paul. The proposed wind facility would be located on the Mississippi River Flyway, which is prime habitat for bald eagles and a variety of other birds as well as bats.

Read more…

September
24
2014

Wind Farm Will Kill Golden Eagles

A PLANNED wind farm could kill golden eagles in the blades of its 24 turbines, environmentalists have warned.

Black throated, great northern and red throated divers, dotterels, white-tailed eagles and hen harriers are also threatened by the scheme planned for an area between Loch Rannoch and Loch Ericht, one of Scotland’s last wildernesses, experts said.

Ospreys, which nest in forestry to the west and fly over the area to fish in lochs Ericht and Mheugaidh, could be killed too.

The developer Netherlands-based Eventus BV, has insisted the scheme can fit into the landscape. But Scottish Natural Heritage said the Talladh-a-Bheithe wind farm would have a damaging effect on birds and mammals, including bats and otters.

Hundreds of residents, businesses and landscape protection organisations also oppose the scheme, including the Mountaineering Council of Scotland (MCofS), the John Muir Trust and the Keep Rannoch Wild campaign.

Read more…

September
24
2014

Renewable Energy Death Toll Impugns Green Claims

Renewable energy sources are killers, not so much green as red. Until recently, renewable energy sources—wind, solar, hydro, etc.—have gotten a pass on the environmental harms they cause. However, as the death toll mounts, the public has begun objecting to the deadly impacts of “green” energy sources.

Hydroelectric dams, once the darlings of the green jet set, have been killing migrating salmon for decades. Despite designers’ best efforts, they have yet to solve the problem, and now dams are being dismantled to save salmon and river ecosystems.

Two decades ago, some environmentalists began referring to wind farms as “cuisinarts of the air” because birds were being mangled by the huge, fast-spinning turbines.

The problem has only gotten worse as the number of wind farms has grown rapidly under the Obama administration’s push for subsidized green energy.

Wind turbines kill bats as well as birds. Most recently, a 7,600-acre wind farm in Nevada was found to have killed 566 bats, more than triple the number it is allowed to take each year. Conservationists believe many more bats die each year but their carcasses are not found.

Read more…

September
22
2014

Wind Farm Turbines Take Toll on Birds of Prey

EAGLES, falcons and other raptors make up to a third of the estimated 1500 birds killed each year at Australia’s biggest wind farm.

The finding of an independent report for Macarthur Wind Farm operator AGL follows 12 monthly searches of 48 turbines at the 140-turbine operation in Victoria that found 576 bird carcasses.

After adjusting for birds eaten by scavengers between searches and the total 140 turbines, Australian Ecological Research Services estimated each turbine killed about 10 birds a year.

The analysis said this would include 500 raptors a year.

AGL has confirmed that 64 bird fatalities were found during the official searches and an ­additional 10 carcasses were found near turbines by maintenance personnel, landowners or ecologists when not undertaking scheduled carcass searches.

The total included eight brown falcons, seven nankeen kestrels, six wedge-tailed eagles, one black falcon, two black-shouldered kites and one spotted harrier.

But an AGL spokesman said the report had “shown no significant impact on threatened ­species”. The company said overall ­estimates of bird and bat mortality “are subject to several sources of bias which may result in inaccurate estimates”.

The report recommended more frequent searches of a smaller number of turbines to get a more accurate assessment.

Read more…

September
19
2014

Colorado Birds Receive Protection Against Wind Turbines

The US’ first wind energy legislation to protect birds against wind energy and other renewable energy has been passed. The Bird Protection Act will come into force in January 2015, requiring energy producers to ensure that their facilities protect birds and other wildlife.

The bill – drafted by State Senator David Balmer – referenced a recent study, which stated that in 2012, 573,000 birds were killed by the wind industry. Another study also referenced by the bill estimated that around 1.4 million birds will be killed annually by 2030, based on current unregulated wind industry expansion.

As of early next year, wind energy producers will be required to follow ‘Bird Smart wind energy standards’, which will include the following:

·         An independent pre-construction environmental assessment to be completed that demonstrates that the wind facility is not located in an area of high risk to birds, such as a known migratory flight path, nesting area, or wetlands;

·         Use of construction practices and technology that follow best practices for preventing birds from colliding with the wind energy facility;

·         Appropriate post-construction assessments to monitor bird impacts;

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