November
17
2014

Bird Collision with Wind Turbine

Here is an real video of a bird collision with a wind turbine.  The video is not edited and is graphic, so please be advised.

 

 

December
10
2014

Wind Turbine Lawsuit Now in Federal Court

A lawsuit filed by local residents to stop development of a wind turbine farm on Turkey Heaven Mountain in Cleburne County last week moved to federal court.

The lawsuit, filed on June 2, had dismissed all the defendants but Oklahoma-based Nations Energy Solutions and Terra-Gen Power from Delaware, so the defendants asked that the case be transferred to federal court.

Anniston attorney Christopher Hopkins, who represents the defendants, filed the notice of the move to federal court Dec. 4.

Reached by phone Wednesday, Hopkins asked to be contacted by email, but had not responded to emails by Wednesday afternoon.

Chad Hopper, attorney for the plaintiffs, said the case was eligible to move because the plaintiffs and the defendants are from different states.

Asked if there was an advantage to moving it to federal court, Hopper said, “That’s a good question. The defendants obviously think so.”

He said the case will probably be heard in Birmingham by a federal judge and will be ruled on under federal law. However the issues are still the same, Hopper said.

Read more…

December
7
2014

Bats Are Disappearing and Scientists Want to Know Why

The bat population has started to disappear and scientists want to know why. At least 90 percent of the Northeast species havebeen dying out, largely due to a fungus that attacks bats who hang out in caves. The fungus is called white-nose syndrome. The growing fungus is not the only reason bats are disappearing.

Recently, many bats have been found dead under wind turbines. Geological studies in Indiana used cameras to monitor wind turbines for months. The surveillance showed that birds who migrated at night avoided the turbines, but bats flew towards them. There is some speculation that bats are attracted to them because they resemble trees with gusting winds blowing through, which means there are insects to be eaten. Gusts of wind create movement in the turbine’s blades and it starts spinning unexpectedly.

The number of bat deaths by turbine has been increasing over the years and are nearing hundreds of thousands. This is a huge hit to the ecosystem because although the winged mammals can live long lives, they take a long time to reproduce. A spokeswoman for the Fish and Wildlife Service, Meagan Racey, said recently that we need to know more about these animals and what is causing a decline in their numbers.

Read more…

November
3
2014

Who Gives a Hoot About Turbines?

The barn owl has done what no anti-wind turbine protester in Port Ryerse has been able to do to date: halt construction of a green energy project in their village.

A woman walking her dog this summer spotted one of the birds — they are on the endangered species list in Ontario — flying into a barn.

An investigation ensued, photographs of the owl perched on a woodpile were taken, and the sighting was confirmed. The evidence was then presented to an environmental review tribunal hearing, which last week slapped a five-month moratorium on the project.

Boralex, the company that wants to construct a four-turbine 10-megawatt wind farm next to Lake Erie, must now apply to the Ontario government for what’s known as an “overall benefit permit” if it wants to continue with the project.

It must submit an amended plan showing how the wind farm will avoid having a negative impact on the owls and that it has explored alternative sites. It must also show it will do something to help the birds, such as creating new habitat.

The tribunal hearing has been adjourned until March 31.

The Port Ryerse case is the first time a project in Ontario has been ordered back to the drawing board due to the presence of barn owls.

As a result, “there are a number of unknowns right now that will take some work and some time to bring to a conclusion,” Sylvia Davis, legal counsel for the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change, wrote in an email to the parties to the hearing.

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October
31
2014

Double, Double, Bats in Trouble: Local Efforts to Save Bats

Bats are in double trouble: Bat species that migrate long distances are being killed in wind turbines, while White-nose syndrome is devastating bat species that migrate shorter distances. Meanwhile, homeowners routinely kill bats when they find them in their houses. But we need bats (just not in our attics!), so safe and humane removal can be done via a “bat exclusion.” That’s the focus of the Halloween installment of WEMU’s “The Green Room”.

Barbara Lucas: I’m at the 13th Annual Great Lakes Bat Festival at Washtenaw Community College. Attending is the Kimball family of Chelsea. They recently moved into an old farmhouse which they share with a small colony of Big Brown bats. Here’s Gabe Kimball, on why he likes them:

Gabe: For one, they are so cool to look at! Also we have a lot a lot less mosquitoes than in the city even. We call it farm TV when we watch the bats leave.

Lucas: Also at the festival is Rob Mies, Executive Director of the Organization for Bat Conservation. He offers to teach the Kimballs the key steps to a bat exclusion, evicting bats without killing them. On the way to the Kimball farmhouse, he tells me why we should fear a world without bats.

Read more…

October
30
2014

Turbines Kill More Birds of Prey than Shooting or Poisoning

Wind turbines have killed more birds of prey in Scotland so far this year than deliberate poisoning or shooting, a government report has revealed.

Four raptors were confirmed killed by the devices between January and June this year and a fifth bird – a golden eagle – was electrocuted by a power line.

Just two birds were confirmed to have been poisoned or shot over the same period.

The figures were revealed by in an interim report published by the Scottish Government-funded Wildlife Incident Investigation Scheme.

Read more…

October
30
2014

Resistance to Bird-Killing Turbines Grows

The natives are restless, and their ire is directed against an intruder armed with taxpayer subsidies and intent on destroying as much scenic beauty and wildlife as it can get away with.

Across the country, giant wind farms, among the ghastliest monstrosities ever devised by man, are scarring the countryside in the name of providing renewable energy. But as the toll of slaughtered birds and bats mounts, people are fighting back. Here’s an update:

Minnesota: Not even the heft of Texas billionaire T. Boone Pickens could overcome the resistance of conservationists and ordinary citizens to the construction of a 48-turbine wind farm near Red Wing, 25 miles southeast of Minneapolis/St. Paul. The proposed wind facility would be located on the Mississippi River Flyway, which is prime habitat for bald eagles and a variety of other birds as well as bats.

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September
24
2014

Wind Farm Will Kill Golden Eagles

A PLANNED wind farm could kill golden eagles in the blades of its 24 turbines, environmentalists have warned.

Black throated, great northern and red throated divers, dotterels, white-tailed eagles and hen harriers are also threatened by the scheme planned for an area between Loch Rannoch and Loch Ericht, one of Scotland’s last wildernesses, experts said.

Ospreys, which nest in forestry to the west and fly over the area to fish in lochs Ericht and Mheugaidh, could be killed too.

The developer Netherlands-based Eventus BV, has insisted the scheme can fit into the landscape. But Scottish Natural Heritage said the Talladh-a-Bheithe wind farm would have a damaging effect on birds and mammals, including bats and otters.

Hundreds of residents, businesses and landscape protection organisations also oppose the scheme, including the Mountaineering Council of Scotland (MCofS), the John Muir Trust and the Keep Rannoch Wild campaign.

Read more…