Posts tagged: bird deaths

What Would Happen If We Brought Birds Back From The Dead?

Extinction is deeper than death—it’s an irreversible biological loss that extends well beyond individuals. At least, that’s what we’ve always understood it to be. Now, some researchers are betting that, in certain cases, extinction might be able to be undone. The emerging field of de-extinction seeks to revive lost species using advances in synthetic biology, including cloning. […]

Wednesday November 9th, 2016 in , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on What Would Happen If We Brought Birds Back From The Dead?

Adelie Penguins Thriving Amid Melting Ice

Adélie Penguins are at home on frigid Antarctica, so it’s logical to assess their noisy breeding colonies as the loss of the continent’s massive ice shelves accelerates. For now, the scientific poop on the krill- and fish-eating bird is good, even if a few local colonies have died out where the most sea ice has disappeared. Read […]

Wednesday October 26th, 2016 in , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Adelie Penguins Thriving Amid Melting Ice

Is Earth Experiencing a Mass Extinction Event?

A major taxonomic review of non-passerine birds (non-perching or non-songbirds) by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) recognizes 13 new extinct birds due to fossil finds or splitting species. In total, the new list now recognizes that 140 birds have gone extinct since the year 1500 AD. This means that in the last […]

Monday October 24th, 2016 in , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Is Earth Experiencing a Mass Extinction Event?

Alaska’s Shorebirds Exposed to Mercury

Shorebirds breeding in Alaska are being exposed to mercury at levels that could put their populations at risk, according to new research from The Condor: Ornithological Applications. Thanks to atmospheric circulation and other factors, the mercury that we deposit into the environment tends to accumulate in the Arctic. Mercury exposure can reduce birds’ reproductive success and […]

Monday August 29th, 2016 in , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Alaska’s Shorebirds Exposed to Mercury

Feather-Munching Bacteria Damage Wild Bird Plumage

A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances links feather-degrading bacteria to damaged plumage on wild birds for the first time, offering new insights into how birds’ ecology and behavior might affect their exposure to these little-studied microbes. Scientists know surprisingly little about the diverse community of microbes that lives on bird feathers. A few of these […]

Thursday August 25th, 2016 in , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Feather-Munching Bacteria Damage Wild Bird Plumage

Fatal Beak Disorder Spreading Among Birds

Scientists have uncovered a fascinating new clue in the global mystery surrounding wild birds with grossly deformed beaks. A team of researchers from the California Academy of Sciences, University of California San Francisco (UCSF), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have identified a novel virus that has been linked to Avian Keratin Disorder (AKD), a […]

Thursday August 18th, 2016 in , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Fatal Beak Disorder Spreading Among Birds

Chemical Pollution Gets to Antarctic Marine Bird Colonies

Latitude is the main factor which determines the organic pollutant concentration in Antarctic giant petrels -emblematic species in the Antarctic and sub-Antarctic regions-, according to an article from the journal Environmental Research in which Professor Jacob González Solís, from the Department of Evolutionary Biology, Ecology and Environmental Sciences and the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of […]

Monday August 15th, 2016 in , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Chemical Pollution Gets to Antarctic Marine Bird Colonies

Botulism in Waterbirds

Outbreaks of botulism killed large percentages of waterbirds inhabiting a wetland in Spain. During one season, more than 80 percent of gadwalls and black-winged stilts died. The botulinum toxin’s spread may have been abetted by an invasive species of water snail which frequently carries the toxin-producing bacterium, Clostridium botulinum, and which is well adapted to […]